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Watch How to Tile a Kitchen Floor Part 1 – The Home Depot

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Learn the steps involved in tiling a kitchen floor. In this video you will learn how to install backer board and tile in a kitchen. Proper planning to help you avoid costly time consuming mistakes when installing a floor is also covered. For more information, visit http://www.homedepot.com/knowhow

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26 Comments

  1. I since determined that the old vinyl under the current layer of vinyl contains asbestos, so we need to encapsulate the whole thing. The top layer of vinyl is shrinking and buckling, so I don't think laminate would go over it. I guess I'll have to add another subfloor over the whole mess and we'll just have to duck our heads in the kitchen, since the floor will be so much higher. 🙁

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  2. Lee-Ann, my house was built in the same decade. I re-tiled my bathroom floor. I installed 1/2" plywood over the planks. I then layed the backerboard over that. Then, the tile. No issues with it yet. Very solid. The only issue I had was the threshold is the same height as the floor now. That is the only down side to doing it this way. You gain some height due to the double layered wood subfloor. I didn't trust the planks for much support though. I am doing my kitchen now the same way.

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  3. My subfloor is plank (the house was built in the 50s. Can I lay backerboard over plank? How smooth and even does the plank need to be? Will the mortar under the backerboard fill in the gaps between the plank? Or do I need to add a layer of some kind of filler before I mortar down the backboard?

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  4. jusst to makee sure that you remove ALL laminate glue,im concerned what sort of tiles the are if you can reuse them, all tiles should come up in little bits if they were ever laid correct lol, but i suppose you can reuse them as long as you clean up the glue on the back of the tiles enough other wise it would be realy hard to get them flat into the glue

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  5. @ak99372 you sure can as longt as you nail it correctly if it is a timber floor if it is a concreate for you can lay directly over the top as long as you prepair it right from the start…. you must first sand the lino with a 36 grit sandpaper followed by a good was with annonia then another good wash with plain water, then you must use a 2 part flexible glue that consists of rubber in the glue … but over 4mm it must be removed as well as the lino glue if on concrete

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  6. @dgard20 you dont need to fill the joints with morter as the tile glue will fill these any way, as for using screws the problem is that the head of the screw will stick up, and if you counter sink them you are braking the surface of the sheet leaveing the screw on an extreamly weak part of the sheet

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  7. @auzziman911
    cant' you just screw down backer board and not mortar? I've done this in my sons kitchen and all is fine. I applied screws probably 6-8 inches apart. I did not mortar and taple backer board cracks.

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  8. @Brenanrules123 what do you have for a sub floor??? if its timber it must have a sub floor other wise any movment from your floor will transfer straight to your tiles, the subfloor is there so the floor is able to move under it preventing cracks and tiles popping

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  9. @elrondzik i would never use ply on a sub floor as the timber will expand and contract a lot im in australia we call the shetting fiber cement i gather that what your calling osb panel??? never use a cement base glue on any thing other then a concreate, your better of using a 2 part flexible glue

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  10. If putting bathroom tile on wood floor Tongue and groove) in an old house do I need to mortar the backer board down?
    Also if the wood floor is not dead level do you use self leveller or just make sure its flat?

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  11. You are installing a 1/4'' bakerboard on top of an OSB panel. Is this acceptable? Would 5/8'' plywood be better than bakerboard? What mortar do you use? I cannot find anything that would be recommended for OSB.

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  12. @MissGraceita can you put a video up so i can see how they are going with it? the cement ""glue"" is ok and they should be able to clean these out with a sharp blade but most pros would clean them as they go as for the large gap there should be a 2-5mm gap allthe way around the edges that a flexible sealent will be applied into to stop cracking 😀

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  13. hi there! I was hoping you could help me. The person that has done my tiling has left gaps all around the kitchen edges have large gaps and there is cement coming out of the cracks. I am in desperate need of help!!

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