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Watch Home Depot Boards: What will or won’t make a bow and why

Watch Home Depot Boards: What will or won’t make a bow and why

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47 Comments

  1. Mike at my Home Depot we have mahogany, cherry and hemlock as well as red oak. What are your thoughts on these woods for a board bow? Thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience with all of us.

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  2. You have a great home depot there. They stock more than one type of timber. Here in the UK boards come pretty much in pine or nothing. For anything else you have to travel to specialist suppliers.

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  3. i have made many good bows from yew (im English) but i am staying in Switzerland for about a year and i have no good supply of branches, i was wondering if European beech would work, i know it is rather hard but i was thinking of a flat bow design, any thoughts?

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  4. Hello Mike, great videos, you seem to do great work. Is there any particular reason you dont get your stock from a lumber yard? homedepot charges more for there poplar than most lumber yards charge for really nice cherry. Plus we have a few yards near where i live who carry hickory. matter of fact, at work we just built 3 big jobs out of hickory so im loaded with scrap hickory.  

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  5. Sorry have it rough tillered down to 1/4 I know I will need to take it further but that is my starting point. I also ran into a little good fortune one of my neighbors does a lot of wood working and he gave me some nice walnut And picture ceder stock for handle material. And then more or less gave me a bear whitetail Hunter compound bow. Still in really good condition. no joke left handed and fits my draw length I couldn't believe it….. but man is my arm sore today 50 pounds didn't think I shot that much.

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  6. Red Oak question, got a 6ft flat bow I am working on and have it down to a 1/4 tiller fading from the handle and 1/2 tip fading up 15" on the sides but as I was tillering I noticed that there were what looks like super dry grain lines… I only have one small run off but those brittle hard growth rings have me worried they are well developed which I have been told is what should look for just don't know if it will be to brittle. Also on the sides taper, can I taper from the handle down to the tip without hurting the bow? Or will it cause it to twist on me? heavy Draw weight isn't a huge concern I actually want a 30 pound so still have a ways to go. 

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  7. I found that to be informative, thanks!
    A suggestion: Check your camera owner's manual for a stabilization feature and turn it on.  It will make a HUGE improvement in the video quality you produce when the camera is being hand held.

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  8. You say that sometimes you don't know why your bows break?

    I believe this has to do with how fast the boards they sell at Home Depot dry, and not that they're super dry. Rapidly dried wood will create micro-fissures in the wood that will be the catalyst for every crack in the boards. Think of them as a tiny vein system of cracks that start below the surface of the wood because the water gets expelled from inside the wood so quickly.

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  9.  popular can be really great for making the riser in a breakdown bow though, and funny enough ive found some in my home depot, they call them hobby boards, and they seem to be on the harder side of poplar. im going to laminate some with a few other types of wood to make a unique riser for my next bow project. but as limbs it is terrible, its so brittle you have to be careful even hammering large nails into it.

         the problem with pine boards is general quality of the wood and trees that are harvested, pick up a few 2×4's and the difference in the feel of the wood between say, select and basic is astounding.

    i think part of the issue is the maturity of the wood.

    if i were to find maple what should i look for in the wood? i actually have a few in my yard. and the woods around my house. any suggestions for harvesting?

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  10. My Dad's cousin told me that ash was a good bow wood. Livivng where it was plentiful he told me to cut a 4-6" sapling and quarter it for use. I never tried making a bow, but may now, What's your take on ash?

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  11. I just picked up a really nice piece of hickory, before seeing this video. This is going to be my first bow, so I would like it to be semi-successful. Haha. What do you think, give the piece of hickory a chance or find a nice piece of maple?

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  12. Personally I have had the best luck with properly grained hard maple. White oak and red oak are awesome in stave form but have issues when made into boards. Properly grained Ash might be very good as well, there were ELB warbows made from Ash back in the day.

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  13. Hey there. Thanks for the informative videos! A few days later i found a perfect board and made my first longbow (elb style). Its light, so im trying to make a warbow and now im confused and put off from all the information out there on which wood will and which wood wont! So, in your opinion, with a hickory backing i bought, what belly material would you choose from a board (i can get hard maple, red oak, white oak maybe ash). Ive been researching for weeks and my instinct tells me white oak

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  14. Stay in the premium hardwood section, this is where they keep the Red Oak and Maple Boards that you will want to use. Do not use any other "Premium Hardwoods" that they carry as they are not good bow woods. No other codes :)

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  15. Hey Mike, got a question for you. I'm looking at some Home Depot wood and I'm running into some code words and wondering what they mean to the perspective bow maker. I'm seeing a lot of wood labeled as "premium hardwood" and "untreated appearance grade." Also any other code words I should be aware of?
    

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  16. One quick question. I bought a piece of red oak for a bow, but the grain isn't quite straight and has a few run-offs. How much would backing it with rawhide or fiberglass tape do for me as far as durability?

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  17. Well said! I have never worked with carbon fiber, but there are some archery shops selling strips and glue online. I have been very curious about the material for quite a while and think I may take the plunge soon.

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  18. Carbon fiber comes in a absolute ton of forms and those forms has various properties. It would be great but be mindful of the types and the epoxies needed to compress it and bond it to a wood substrate.

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